#SheCantBeAutistic

I can’t count how many times I have had someone tell me that I couldn’t possibly be autistic because I didn’t “act” like it. I have even had people tell me that my son wasn’t autistic by one of his previous teachers because “she knew autism and she just didn’t see it” in my son. My son has a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder given by a pediatric specialist.

There are so many people that like to play the part of  armchair psychologist when it comes to autism. Their view of autism is greatly skewed and often influenced by the portrayal of people with autism in the media which leads to their ideas of autism being vastly inaccurate.

I have been told by my mother that when I was younger she attempted to have me tested for autism but because I was not non-verbal, doctors refused to test me. Due to this I still cannot find a doctor that will give me an “official diagnosis” of autism even though several therapist have said I meet the criteria, no doctor wants to listen to me and take the time to make the diagnosis.

It is time that we cast away the idea that autism fits into a neat little box and that all cases follow a textbook definition like so many other disorders do. Autism is as unique as the people that have it.

 

A powerful hashtag (#SheCantBeAutistic) has been blowing up on Twitter this month bringing attention to an issue that I’ve been talking about a lot recently. I was not diagnosed until I was almost 30 years old because people thought #SheCantBeAutistic. They were wrong. I am Autistic and I spent too many years waiting to find […]

via #SheCantBeAutistic — Anonymously Autistic

#asd, #asd-adults, #autism, #autistic-adults, #autistic-triggers